Shapeshifter
thedanielpham:

“The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Growing out of the first Earth Day, Earth Day Network (EDN) works with over 22,000 partners in 192 countries to broaden, diversify and mobilize the environmental movement. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.”

thedanielpham:

“The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air ActClean Water ActEndangered Species Act and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Growing out of the first Earth Day, Earth Day Network (EDN) works with over 22,000 partners in 192 countries to broaden, diversify and mobilize the environmental movement. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.”

Love this graphic from Cheech and Chong!

Love this graphic from Cheech and Chong!

Happy 420!

Happy 420!

Desire - Bob Dylan

I believe the first time I heard Dylan sing “Hurricane” was on Tom Snyder’s late show in ‘75. I was inspired and galvanized by the song and the story of the famous boxer wrongly accused of a triple murder. I researched it and felt in my heart that “Hurricane” Carter was innocent. I wanted to help him in any way I could. I painted “Free The Hurricane” on the back window of my Plymouth Duster with white shoe polish. I protested in Dallas. I went to “Night Of The Hurricane ll” in Houston in January of ‘76, when Dylan, Roger McGuinn, members of The Band, Stevie Wonder, Stephen Stills, Dr. John, Ringo, Santana and dozens of other entertainers performed at the Astrodome in an effort to raise money and awareness to help get Carter released from prison. We all hoped that day would come soon. It didn’t. It didn’t happen for many years. That is the point in my life that I fully realized the true role that race plays in our system of “justice” in America. A sad reality that is still alive and well in the “Land of the Free” -Clif

Ignore haters, detractors, non-believers and critics. Define your goals, set your course, stay focused, work hard, and live YOUR dream!

deathistheillusion:

Watch the video for yourself.  What you’re seeing is a massive sinkhole in Bayou Corne, Louisiana.  It’s estimated to be 25 acres wide and 750 feet deep.  But while sinkholes often occur naturally, this one is the result of a collapsed underground storage cavity operated by Texas Brine.  The first sign was a strange bubbling (turns out it’s methane) of the swamp in early 2012.  Then, in August 2012, the ground shifted sideways 10 inches, the sinkhole formed, and 350 residents were forced to evacuate.

New York Times explains it nicely:

A few words of fantastical explanation: Much of Louisiana sits atop an ancient ocean whose salty remains, extruded upward by the merciless pressure of countless tons of rock, have formed at least 127 colossal underground pillars. Seven hundred feet beneath Bayou Corne, the Napoleonville salt dome stretches three miles long and a mile wide — and plunges perhaps 30,000 feet to the old ocean floor.

A bevy of companies has long regarded the dome as more or less a gigantic piece of Tupperware, a handy place to store propane, butane and natural gas, and to make salt water for the area’s many chemical factories. Over the years, they have repeatedly punched into the dome, hollowing out 53 enormous caverns.

In 1982, on the dome’s western edge, Texas Brine Company sank a well to begin work on a big cavern: 150 to 300 feet wide and four-tenths of a mile deep, it bottomed out more than a mile underground. Until it capped the well to the cavern in 2011, the company pumped in fresh water, sucked out salt water and shipped it to the cavern’s owner, the Occidental Chemical Corporation.

Who is to blame for what happened next is at issue in a barrage of lawsuits. But at some point, the well’s western wall collapsed, and the cavern began filling with mud and rock. The mud and rock above it dropped into the vacated space, freeing trapped natural gas.

The gas floated up; the rock slipped down. The result was a yawning, bubbling sinkhole.

Meanwhile, the sinkhole continues to grow, taking more land and cypress trees like in the gifs above.  Oh yeah, and there’s diesel floating on the surface of the water now, too.  Geologists believe it’ll stop eventually, possibly at 50 acres, but no one really knows.  The Daily Kos calls it “the biggest ongoing disaster in the United States you haven’t heard of”.

Roadside geology in Oklahoma; the Arbuckle Mountains in south central Oklahoma. I have always been fascinated by the way the beds lie almost completely vertical here. My father blasted cuts in many parts of these mountains to help build some of the state’s earliest main highways in the 40’s and 50’s.
Photo By Clif Doyal
The Arbuckle Mountains are the oldest known formations in the United States between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains. They contain a core of granite and gneiss that date back at least 1.4 billion years. The core is overlain by a 1,500 feet (460 m) layer of Cambrian-era rhyolite that is about 525 million years old. Atop the rhyolite is about 15,000 feet (4,600 m) of folded and faulted limestones, dolomites, sandstones, and shales deposited in shallow seas from Late Cambrian through Pennsylvanian time (515 - 290 million years ago). -Text source: Wikipedia

Roadside geology in Oklahoma; the Arbuckle Mountains in south central Oklahoma. I have always been fascinated by the way the beds lie almost completely vertical here. My father blasted cuts in many parts of these mountains to help build some of the state’s earliest main highways in the 40’s and 50’s.

Photo By Clif Doyal

The Arbuckle Mountains are the oldest known formations in the United States between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains. They contain a core of granite and gneiss that date back at least 1.4 billion years. The core is overlain by a 1,500 feet (460 m) layer of Cambrian-era rhyolite that is about 525 million years old. Atop the rhyolite is about 15,000 feet (4,600 m) of folded and faulted limestones, dolomites, sandstones, and shales deposited in shallow seas from Late Cambrian through Pennsylvanian time (515 - 290 million years ago). -Text source: Wikipedia

New growth and wild flowers peek through last year’s leftover dead leaves. I love this time of the year! ~Clif

New growth and wild flowers peek through last year’s leftover dead leaves. I love this time of the year! ~Clif

I bet this would get your day going!

I bet this would get your day going!